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Why So Humid? How Hot 8 Yoga adds humidity to provide a healthier practice

Posted by on February 17, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Why So Humid? How Hot 8 Yoga adds humidity to provide a healthier practice

Why So Humid? How Hot 8 Yoga adds humidity to provide a healthier practice

In the hot environment created in a hot yoga room, heaters evaporate much of the natural humidity in the air. That is why many yoga rooms will feel like their heat is a “dry heat”. This is particularly noticeable in yoga studios that use infrared or radiant heat. Without the introduction of humidity from another source, these rooms can have almost no humidity. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) suggests a range of 45% – 55% humidity to manage health effects and illnesses. At Hot 8 Yoga all of our studios have humidifiers emitting pure, disinfected steam directly into your yoga class. If levels are not properly maintained, a studio will not only feel very uncomfortable to practice in, but you may become susceptible to respiratory disorders or chemical reactions. Our rooms are constantly monitoring the humidity and the exhaust will pull out excess humidity or add in when levels reach below 40%. During the winter months, heaters and cold temperatures may lead to dry air with low humidity. This dry air can lead to dry skin, irritated sinuses and throat, and itchy eyes. Over time, exposure to low humidity can dry out and inflame the mucous membrane lining your respiratory tract. When this natural barrier is no longer working properly, it increases your risk of colds, the flu, and other infections. Further, in low humidity certain viruses may be able to survive longer, further increasing your risk of contracting an infection. For instance, one study found that flu viruses survive longer, and spread more easily, when humidity levels are low, according to a study conducted by Dr. Peter Palese and featured in the New York Times article, “Study Shows Why the Flu Likes Winter.” by Gina Kolata in 2007. “Nasal congestion may also be related to the temperature and humidity of inhaled air — perhaps more than any other variable,” says Dr. Mercola, from the article “Effects of Low Humidity on Health,” from 2014. The authors of the study suggested that the interaction between temperature and humidity influence “nasal cooling” as the air moves through your nasal cavity. This nasal cooling is detected by “sensors” inside your nose, which stimulate the sensation of airflow being either easy or obstructed, with cooler air resulting in feelings of less obstruction. At Hot 8 Yoga we are making sure levels never reach too high of a humidity where nasal congestion could be triggered. And of course we are watching the low side in order to not have dry air (less than 40% humidity), because it is known to increase feelings of congestion. If you dry out your sinus membranes they will only be irritated further. Exercising in humid heat can overall get you a better workout and practice. Many athletes choose to do their training either in high altitudes or in high-humidity areas because of the benefits of training in those environments. MVO2 peak is the maximum rate of oxygen consumption attained by an individual, as measured during incremental exercise. This exercise capacity (VO2 peak) markedly improves during exercise in humid air. When tested on subjects with EIB (Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction), their capacity was increased and their rate EIB was reduced to half. From our state-of-the-art climate control system, to our UV-C bacteria and viral disinfectant procedures, to our...

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Don’t Get Sick! Hot 8 Yoga Heat Helps you get a Healthier Practice

Posted by on February 13, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Don’t Get Sick! Hot 8 Yoga Heat Helps you get a Healthier Practice

Don’t Get Sick! Hot 8 Yoga Heat Helps you get a Healthier Practice

Dust mites. Parasites. Viruses. And virulent bacteria. Practice or teach yoga in a group, and these bugs will be beside you as you move from Surya Namaskar to Sarvangasana. It’s enough to make a yogini sick—unless you take careful steps to guard against germs. In Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra, saucha or cleanliness is considered an essential niyama or self-discipline. At Hot 8 Yoga we are honoring this precept as we disinfect the air, provide floors that will not grow bacteria, add humidity into our rooms, scrub our mats, steam clean our yoga floors, and work to combat the growing number of illnesses and infections that are related to group fitness. How does Hot 8 Yoga disinfect the air we breathe? “Eighty percent of disease is caught by direct or indirect contact—either interacting with a person who carries germs or touching a surface where those organisms live,” says Philip M. Tierno, Ph.D., author of The Secret Life of Germs and director of clinical microbiology at New York University Medical Center. “Both types of contact are common in yoga centers.” Hot 8 Yoga has developed a state-of-the-art climate control system in which fresh air is added when needed and all of the air in the studio is being circulated to pass over ultraviolet lights that we have installed in all of the ducting system. This method of sterilization has been used primarily in medical facilities and sterile work facilities, however Hot 8 Yoga has taken the science from these facilities and added it to our yoga rooms. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) is a disinfection method that uses short-wavelength ultraviolet (UV-C) light to kill or inactivate microorganisms by destroying nucleic acids and disrupting their DNA, leaving them unable to perform vital cellular functions. Hot 8 Yoga’s UVGI devices produce strong enough UV-C light in our circulating air to make them inhospitable environments to microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, molds and other pathogens. We have coupled the UVGI with our filtration system to disinfect the air in all the yoga studios and create an air environment that is 99.98% free of all harmful bacteria. Hot 8 Yoga’s UVGI technology is energy effective, environmentally-friendly and a chemical-free way to eradicate dangerous microorganisms in our hot yoga rooms. The result is fresh air that doesn’t smell and is not full of harmful bacteria. Not all hot yoga studios are created equal. At Hot 8 Yoga, we have taken the time, energy and extra expense to create the healthiest possible yoga practice environment. The benefits of a clean air environment are enormous, clean air will: help prevent colds and influenza, prevent headaches after class, provide relief from asthma, hay fever and sinus problems, reduce fatigue, and breathing problems, and relieve sore throats, runny noses, wheezing and sneezing. What about the floors we walk on? Bacteria can survive for several hours to several days on the floors we walk on, while viruses can actually linger for weeks. Warm, humid conditions such as those found in hot yoga, vinyasa, or ashtanga rooms are the perfect breeding ground for these bugs. How many types of germs lurk in a group yoga setting? Literally thousands. Just walking across an unsanitary studio floor is enough for a yogini to catch some really nasty things like staph infections. Unlike restaurants (overseen by health...

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Ever Had a Headache After a Hot Yoga Practice? How Hot 8 Yoga’s Heat Helps You Get A Healthier Workout

Posted by on February 4, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on Ever Had a Headache After a Hot Yoga Practice? How Hot 8 Yoga’s Heat Helps You Get A Healthier Workout

Ever Had a Headache After a Hot Yoga Practice? How Hot 8 Yoga’s Heat Helps You Get A Healthier Workout

The act of breathing lives at the center of any yoga practice. The rush of fresh oxygen into the bloodstream has the ability to calm our nerves, focus our mind, and ignite our mental and physical endurance. If your practice includes Ujjayi Breath, you’ve experienced the power of fully integrating your breath with your practice. The combination of movement with breath is the essential union that unlocks the life changing abilities of yoga. When we breathe, we take in the air around us, containing oxygen and other gases that our lungs filter and use to oxygenate our red bloods cells. Those cells travel through our bloodstream to deliver oxygen to where it’s needed in the body. The oxygen is swapped for the carbon dioxide that our body produces during cellular respiration and the same cells carry it back to the lungs to be exhaled during the next breath. The healthy exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide is essential during periods of physical exertion, and is why breathing is so crucial to your yoga practice. But where does all that carbon dioxide go? It is important to ensure that there is an adequate supply of oxygen wherever you are practicing yoga. At Hot 8 Yoga, we want to give our yogis the best experience possible. We’ve developed a custom, state-of-the-art air filtration system that not only removes unhealthy toxins and bacteria from the air, but also continuously monitors the carbon dioxide levels in the heated room. The system uses an open-loop to filter and purify while adding fresh oxygenated air throughout the practice. When the CO2 monitor (in all of our yoga rooms) detects an unfavorable change in the quality of the air such that too much CO2 has been emitted into the room from all of the yoga participants, it automatically pulls in fresh, filtered air in from the outside. Then adds it to the stream of purified air that gets pumped back into the room, until the levels return to optimal. The system also regulates the humidity levels with purified steam. Our open-loop filtration system allows us to create the highest quality atmosphere for our yogis to practice in. You can experience every Ujjayi Breath you take with the comfort of knowing that you are breathing in the cleanest air you will breathe all day. That purity allows you to truly detoxify yourself and come out feeling refreshed in a way that no other studio in Los Angeles can leave you feeling. Ever wonder why you get a headache after an intense yoga class? We are the only studio in Los Angeles to provide this advanced CO2-filtration method in our practice rooms. Many other yoga studios have begun using Infrared Heat or Radiant Heat as a method of heating their rooms. There is no doubt that Infrared Heat or Radiant Heat is cheaper to install and way easier to maintain, however such heating systems do not allow for any purification of CO2 or addition of fresh air into the yoga room. Here at Hot 8 Yoga we would never use Infrared or Radiant Heating. The heating elements for Infrared Heating are generally just inches above your head with no ability of getting air in from the outside. Imagine what would happen to the level of CO2 in a...

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How Meditation Changes Your Brain

Posted by on January 25, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on How Meditation Changes Your Brain

How Meditation Changes Your Brain

There are a lot of reasons why people think meditation doesn’t work. It’s too simple, or I’m not doing it right. How can sitting quietly for ten minutes and trying to focus only on your breath help you get more things done in the day? It doesn’t work on me, or I can’t keep my mind still for that long. I’m just not the kind of person who meditates; that’s for people with a lot of time on their hands. I simply can’t spare the extra time during my day to focus, only on myself. Not surprisingly, these same people may be the ones most likely to suffer from anxiety, depression and insomnia because of the imbalance in their lives. Too much of their energy is focused on outward, result-oriented activity; too little attention is paid to the health of their mind. Meditation is like exercise for your brain. It stimulates the region of your brain that enables you to complete complex tasks, while simultaneously developing other regions that govern your ability to empathize with others. By eliminating distractions and training your brain to focus on a single action, breathing, you improve your attention span and deepen your sense of self-awareness. For so long, meditation’s claim that you can improve your life by just sitting in stillness has been easily ignored by skeptics. But recent studies have shown that the change claimed to be possible through meditation can actually be measured scientifically, and the results are astounding. Sara Lazar, a neuroscientist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, has been doing her post-doc research on the measurable effects of meditation on the brain, and her findings indicate that meditation not only reduces stress, but it actually changes your brain chemistry. In her first study, Lazar looked at long term meditators and compared their brains to those of a control group. The comparison showed that those people who had practiced yoga and meditation for many years had an increased amount of grey matter in the auditory and sensory cortex. This might not seem that surprising, considering that practicing mindfulness through yoga and meditation is focused on paying attention to your breathing, your surroundings and the present moment – it would seem to follow that the parts of your brain dedicated to experiencing sights and sounds would improve. What was surprising, however, was that the brains of the long-term meditators also had more grey matter in their front cortex, the part of the brain associated with working memory and executive decision-making. Many studies have shown that our cortex shrinks as we age, but remarkably, in this one region of the brain, the long-term meditators had the same amount of grey matter as someone half their age. Lazar designed a study that would take people who had never meditated before and put half the group through an eight-week mindfulness program for reducing stress and anxiety, while keeping the other half as a control, and measuring the results between their brains after the program had completed. The study revealed that the mindfulness program increased the volume of four major regions of the brain, correlating to substantial changes in the essential components of our personality and experience of the world. Regions that control learning, cognition, memory, emotional regulation, empathy and compassion were all...

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5 Reasons To Start Your Teacher Training

Posted by on January 20, 2017 in Blog | Comments Off on 5 Reasons To Start Your Teacher Training

Become An Inspirational Warrior Few people get the chance to create meaningful change in other people on a daily basis. But with each class, yoga teachers have the unique opportunity to stand in front of dedicated, open-minded students ready to be inspired. You will experience the life-changing benefits of your yoga practice and be able to pass that knowledge onto others. Even if you aren’t looking to become a yoga teacher, your training will deepen your understanding of yoga, build your confidence with your practice, and grow your enthusiasm by giving you the ability to share it with those you love. Go Deep Into Your Practice Teacher Trainings are a unique way to truly deepen your understanding of yoga. The power of an intensive course of this kind will give you the ability to elevate your personal practice to new levels that you can’t experience in a typical yoga class. It’s a powerful way to push yourself further into yoga than you have ever gone before, while simultaneously expanding your understanding of the science of yoga. Give Yourself Newfound Freedom While yoga is a deeply spiritual and personal practice, it is also a fantastic way to give yourself financial freedom, expand your world and pursue your passions. Is there something you’ve been wanting to dedicate your time to, but haven’t been able to break away from you full-time job? Becoming a yoga teacher by taking a teacher training can give you an incredible job that is fun and flexible to your schedule, finally giving you the freedom to chase after your dreams. Expand Your Mind If you’ve been taking yoga classes for a few months, or even a few years, you still may feel lost when you hear your teacher talking about the Yamas and Niyamas. With a teacher training, you get the chance to dive deep into the philosophy of yoga, learning about yoga’s moral and ethical codes, its history and the meanings of its essential words. You’ll learn about the eight components of yoga through the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, including the essential translation of yoga as the practice of quieting the mind. Strengthen Your Relationship and Grow Your Community Hopefully, attending class has opened your world up to the most incredible people. If you’ve ever wanted to strengthen those relationships and join a loving, supportive and engaged community of yogis, teacher trainings are your chance. The experience of engaging with your practice on this level, exploring your own personal strength through intimacy and honesty, gives you lifelong skills to deepen your relationship with yourself and those you love. You will gain profound insight and confidence that will radiate into the world around you, building your compassion and empathy for others. Why Hot8 Teacher Training? Hot 8 Yoga is the perfect place to start your teacher training, with a range of additional features available during your experience. Highly Experienced Trainers Our teaching team includes some of the most passionate, experienced yoga teachers around. You will be welcomed into a community trained to expand your mind and deepen your practice. Small Student-To-Teacher Ratio While the industry standard is to have 20 to 30 students for every teacher, a much smaller student-to-teacher ratio is key. At Hot 8 Yoga, we believe the more intimate the class, the more effective...

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Why you should try Yoga Teacher Training even if you don’t want to become a teacher!

Posted by on December 16, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Why you should try Yoga Teacher Training even if you don’t want to become a teacher!

Why you should try Yoga Teacher Training even if you don’t want to become a teacher!

Whether you are interested in simply learning more about yoga, becoming self-employed, or adding teaching to your life, a YTT can be the perfect route. If you haven’t been able to find your community quite yet within your yoga practice, joining a YTT will lead you right to your yoga family. Surrounding yourself with a supportive group of like-minded people will give you the comfort and ease to dig deeper. And this will be just the beginning of your family! Many people leave YTT with a more spiritual-rooted practice that they hadn’t reached before taking classes and with their practice at home. It’s an amazing feeling to come to such a place of self-discovery in a communal space. Yoga Teacher Trainings aren’t just for aspiring teachers. Taking a teacher training is an amazing way to delve deeper into your favorite style of yoga. It will help you achieve or get closer to your goals in yoga, whether it be in your physical, mental or spiritual practice. We all have different reasons for practicing, but we come together, connected as a community. You will learn about the 8 Limbs of Yoga, which are often cited as the philosophical basis for modern postural yoga. The sutras outline eight “limbs” of yoga, laying out a path for an aspiring yogi to follow. Throughout the programs there will be focuses on different areas – from physical asana practice to breathwork and anatomy, to meditation and the yoga lifestyle, to the study of yoga philosophy and the business and ethics of yoga. A teacher training can really push the boundaries of what you thought your mind and body were capable of. So be prepared to experience a breakthrough ranging from the moment you find proper alignment in a pose, finally being able to truly meditate, or cultivating a deep sense of physical and emotional growth. A decision you’ll have to make before trying a Yoga Teacher Training is which style you pursue. I would start off by looking at which classes you gravitate towards usually and which style do you feel the most passion for. I would recommend trying as many different classes that are offered and with different teachers and studios if that’s available to you. You never know if it’s a style or a teacher that may light the way for you! Trying out a new teacher or style each time you practice is a great way to ease out of your comfort zone. You will definitely need that skill (or attain it) for a YTT. A YTT won’t only benefit your practice and your ability to teach, but it will also help you gain self-esteem and guide a team. You will find it easier to work with and guide colleagues, classmates, etc. toward a common goal. You may find yourself speaking more directly from the heart and with complete pure and honest intention. The most important part of the experience is you will continue to discover more and more about yourself. This is a personal journey that may bring rise to certain emotions you had found inaccessible before. Embrace this new awareness! The more you know and love yourself, the more you can connect with and support others. Find the connection between your own mind, body and breath. Let that set...

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Mood Boosting in the Heat

Posted by on November 25, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Mood Boosting in the Heat

Mood Boosting in the Heat

I have been depressed and anxious for as long as I can remember. My mom passed away when I was six and my father raised me on his own from there. He was fifty-five when he had me and struggled to connect with a young daughter. Whether it is chemical or simply the longing for deeper nurture, my mood has suffered. I have participated in many sports from a young age and I think that was the only time I felt high enough to get through that week or month. As I got older I became interested in running, always needing to have the fastest mile in school. That turned into long distance running, which I recovered from with hot baths or saunas. I was never necessarily interested in yoga from a young age, but when I heard about hot yoga, I knew that was for me. Any time I step into a sauna, or sit and bake out in the sun until I’m sweating, or practice any sort of exercise in a hot setting, I feel somewhat euphoric. I strive for these euphoric states. I have lived in the high highs and the low lows. I struggle with living in the middle, the everyday. A recent study has found that increasing your body temperature through spending time in a hyperthermic chamber, has benefited depressed patients, in noticeable numbers. A University of Arizona associate professor of psychiatry, Dr. Charles Raison, became interested in the relationship between body temperature and mood. This emerged from his study of Tibetan Buddhist monks living in the Himalayas. He was intrigued by the monks’ tummo meditation practice, in which they use specialized breathing techniques to increase their body temperature. This gave Dr. Raison the idea of utilizing a hyperthermic chamber to test depressed patients’ moods. To take us back for a moment; the 1927 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to an Austrian doctor with an unusual obsession. Julius Wagner-Jauregg had been treating bouts of dementia in people with advanced syphilis by injecting them with blood from a malaria patient. The induced malarial fevers, he reported in 1917, curbed their dementia. The new hyperthermia study included 30 people with mild depression. About half the group went through a body-warming treatment that elevated their body temperature to about 101.3 degrees Fahrenheit for a little over an hour using infrared lights and heating coils placed a few feet away. The other group went through a procedure that was staged to look similar, but didn’t heat their bodies as much. After that single session, the volunteers returned to the lab for weekly psychiatric evaluations for six weeks. Both groups saw improvement in their depression symptoms. But only those who had the full hyperthermia saw their improved moods last through that period. The Body to the Brain Dr. Raison has always been interested in the impact that the body has on the brain. “I was very interested in studying [the Tibetan Buddhist monks living in the Himalayas], and because of that interest I discovered that the pathways involved in how the body regulates heat – or thermoregulation, the ability of the brain and the body to maintain a normal body temperature – are the same pathways involved in depression,” Raison said. “Serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine – all these...

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Take a Deep Breath, Relieve Your Stress

Posted by on November 17, 2016 in Events | Comments Off on Take a Deep Breath, Relieve Your Stress

Earlier this year, after I lost my temper and began arguing with my partner, he took a moment of pause and said, “Take a deep breath.” Even in my anger, I knew he wasn’t trying to be patronizing, he simply knew I was irritated and wanted to help me relax. This is his thing; he spends 15 minutes every morning meditating. But I don’t. I suffer from an all-too-common condition. Anxiety, depression, PTSD, ADHD, whatever the doctors have offered to diagnosis it as, I know it simply as: I can’t quiet my mind. Meditation has always felt like something that just wasn’t for me. You contorted yourself into uncomfortable positions, you had a mantra, you sat still for long periods of time. I couldn’t imagine making that a part of my life. And yet, in the midst of that fight, I decided to try. I took a deep breath. And then another. And then, a space opened up. I realized that you didn’t need to repeat some secret mantra or contort yourself into full lotus. You just needed to breathe. Just inhale, and exhale What works for me and many other beginners is called “coherent breathing”. It is a simple practice of inhaling for a count of six, and then exhaling for a count of six. For those just beginning the practice, it can be helpful to start at a count of three, working up with each new breath. You can be sitting upright or lying down, whatever is most comfortable; there’s no particular posture you need to assume to make it effective. To help narrow your focus on your breathing, you can place one or both hands atop your belly as you breath, feeling your abdomen rise and fall with each breath. When you take a moment to sit down and breathe, you may start worrying about things you have to get done that day, people you have to call, emails you have to respond to. Just come back to the awareness of your breathing. The longer you are able to keep your focus on that and nothing else, the more effective it will be at calming you down and relieving the stress of the day. Focus on your breath and the heavy stuff slips away. It sounds so simple, but there’s a complex biological process at work when you breathe deeply. During times of stress, we tend to breath in rapid, short breaths. Under duress, the oxygen levels in our bloodstream increase, carbon dioxide levels decrease and your blood’s pH comes out of balance. How breathing calms us down “Consciously changing the way you breathe appears to send a signal to the brain to adjust the parasympathetic branch of the nervous system,” says New York Times reporter Lesly Alderman, from her article Breathe. Exhale. Repeat. The Benefits of Controlled Breathing. “[Coherent Breathing] can slow the heart rate and digestion and promote feelings of calm and activate the sympathetic system, which controls the release of stress hormones like cortisol.” As the parasympathetic nervous system reacts to your controlled breaths, the blood’s pH level comes back into balance, and the body readjusts in a variety of ways, including the release of a acetylcholine, which lowers the heart rate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid, a brain chemical closely correlated with calmness and...

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Fountain of Youth

Posted by on November 3, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Fountain of Youth

Fountain of Youth

Mindfulness—that awesome reality check that let’s you know just how little control you really have over your mind—is still worth the effort, and here’s why. Meditation literally transforms cortical tissue in the brain – good. Mindfulness meditation has also been discovered to influence key aspects of human biology connected to cellular and body aging – very good. Cue choir, trumpets and fireworks. We all know that stress causes lots of physiological changes in the body, but did you know stress actually leads to premature aging? Scientists use telomeres – the ends of our chromosomes – as an indicator of cellular age. The length of the telomere shows how quickly a cell is aging. Therefore, when a telomere erodes away, the chromosome begins to degrade, signaling the cell to cease dividing or to die. Not good. So how can we change the length of our telomeres and our life? Scientists have found meditation to be an effective way to both slow the erosion of telomeres and repair and re-lengthen them. In fact, Elizabeth Hoge from Harvard University found that people who meditate have longer telomeres, and possibly longer lives [1]. Theories differ as to how exactly meditation boosts telomere growth, but more than likely it has something to do with the fact that meditation simply reduces stress. Everyone ages, some quicker than others, depending on the amount of stress they are regularly managing. Come lengthen your life with Hot 8 Yoga’s new Invigor8 Meditation practice Monday through Friday after your favorite morning classes! See you on the...

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Yoga Sculpt Teacher Training

Posted by on October 10, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Yoga Sculpt Teacher Training

Yoga Sculpt Teacher Training

sculpt – verb – create or represent (something) by carving, casting, or other shaping techniques synonyms: carve, model, chisel, sculpture, fashion, form, shape, cast, cut, hew I never anticipated enjoying a yoga practice which incorporates free weights and high energy cardio movements in a heated room. Heck…if you asked me 5 years ago if I’d like to attend such a class, I would’ve refused without a second thought. As a “traditional” yogi, having come from a very spiritual background, I frankly thought it sacrilegious to bastardize yoga in such a way. I stand corrected. Collaboration is what makes the creative world goes round. Fusion. The coming together of many ideas, to ultimately create something harmonious. And after my accidental transition into teaching Sculpt almost 4 years ago, I continue to find this harmony and synergy on a daily basis. I start off every Sculpt class, with a disclaimer – my personal belief on what this practice is intended to be. “… a Power flow class, which with the help and addition of free weights, allows us to explore and isolate various muscle groups, ultimately enhancing and strengthening our vinyasa (or any other modality of yoga) practice.” I find that the student attracted to this particular practice, is an individual who is seeking just that. Something relatable, i.e a weight lifting regiment, that also – whether consciously realizing this, or not – leaves the body (…and ultimately the mind), in a state of utter bliss. A lengthening and strengthening of muscles and connective tissue, through endurance and discipline exercises, that by definition carves, chisels, forms, cuts and creates, not just a healthy physical body, but more importantly, a healthy relationship with the physical body. And that, my friends, is the goal. To create a healthy, positive and loving relationship with the physical body. An awareness of feeling good. Because it’s this feeling good, that translates into a smile, a glow, a love for self. And Lord knows – a love for self is essential in order to love another. Isn’t that why we do yoga? A connection to love – for self, for another, for each other? Every class ends with; “…the light (and love) in me, acknowledges and sees to the light (and love) in you. “ For in that place, is the one love. The ultimate bliss. “So you’re telling me I can attain this with weights in hand, grooving to some deep house, at 105 degrees?” Yes, my yogi friends. Yes I am. Let’s collaborate and find bliss, shall...

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